Parent Committed

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The PARENT COMMITTED campaign is about providing support to parents and families with teenagers. This campaign urges parents to renew their commitment as a parent and support their child through their journey into adulthood—when they are discovering and defining who they are. The greatest influence on a young person’s decision to drink alcohol is the world they live in. The number one protective factor against youth alcohol abuse is a strong parent-child relationship—a PARENT COMMITTED.

It is time to stop accepting teen drinking as a rite of passage and to understand the threat it poses to healthy development. Parents play a vital role in replacing pro-alcohol messages with clear messages urging young people not to drink!

Today, nearly 10.8 million youth, ages 12-20, are underage drinkers.

It takes a Community COMMITTED to eliminate underage drinking!

Notice

Be aware of the facts

Alcohol use by young people is most often made possible by adults buying it, providing it or allowing it to be consumed in their homes.

The PARENT COMMITTED campaign is about providing support to parents and families with teenagers. This campaign urges parents to renew their commitment as a parent and support their child through their journey into adulthood—when they are discovering and defining who they are.

Choose

Make the best choice for your family

Do you feel a little overwhelmed by today’s teen culture, including what’s happening on the Web? Choose to be involved and aware of the information your child is navigating and experiencing.

Check out this video of a recent presentation at Parent U on how to safeguard your child’s use of technology. Topics include online bullying, sexting, social media (SnapChat, Google+, Instagram, etc)parental controls, and video grames. By Detective Zack LaFerriere, GVPD:  Technology | DOUBLE EDGED

Some of the hottest music teens listen to today is about drug use and other risky behaviors. Which songs/artists does your teen listen to? How often are they referring to drugs and alcohol?

Ask your teen to show you the photos he/she has taken with his/her cell phone, or view the music and videos he/she has downloaded onto their iPod (or MP3). Go to the “25 Most Played” list. Is there anything you are surprised by and should talk about?

Visit social networking sites browse the profiles of teens who are your child’s age to see what they say, what their interests are and what they are doing online.

Choose to Eat Together

  • Parents who frequently eat with their children are much more involved in their kids’ lives.
  • Parents who have frequent family dinners are more likely to say they know the parents of their teen’s closest friends, know the names of their teen’s teachers and believe they have a good relationship with their teen.
  • 58% of teens report having dinner with their family at least five times a week.
  • The top three reasons given for not having more frequent dinners were that parents work late, are too busy and that family members have conflicting schedules.

Bottom Line: Make It Your Choice

Do not let other parents choose when your child will drink alcohol. If the parent community does not unite to eliminate underage drinking, the result may be that other parents will choose to buy alcohol, serve alcohol or allow underage drinking in their homes.

The goal of this program is to reduce underage drinking and youth access to alcohol by increasing support to parents and families with teens.

Act

Follow a family plan of action

Once you have more information and know more about the world your teen lives in, you are ready to act. Below is advice for parents to help close the generation gap and help their teens make good decisions.

  • Get to know your teen’s friends.
  • Get to know the parents of your teen’s friends.
  • Help your teen realize the difference between the credible and incredible.
  • Get “savvy” about the media that is available to youth today.
  • Help your teen critically analyze the messages he/she receives through ads, music, movies and television.
  • Be a good role model. Be the person you want your teen to be.
  • Set clear, reasonable boundaries for your children and family.
  • Engage in activities with your children—family game night, going to the park, helping them with their homework, or just hanging out.